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International Spotlight: Canada

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Flag_map_of_Greater_Canada.png
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Flag_map_of_Greater_Canada.png

The Canadian music market offers great potential for American artists. As a largely English-speaking nation in such close proximity to the US, similar musical tastes and shared culture allow American artists to have continued success selling records, playing gigs and getting radio spins.

The Canadian Music Market


Population: 35 million
Recorded Music Revenue: $436.9 million ($544.1 million CAD)
Statutory Mechanical Royalty Rate: $0.08 per song ($0.083 CAD)
Notable Songwriters: Justin Bieber, Michael Buble, Avril Lavigne, Celine Dion
Description: The Canadian music market is the seventh largest in the world. Canadian fans have similar behaviors to American fans - they were quicker to adopt digital downloads than other major music markets and have adopted streaming services at a similar rate, but not quite as rapidly as some European markets. Digital downloads of both tracks and albums continue to grow in Canada, unlike the United States where this trend has reversed. The Canada Council of the Arts subsidizes musicians and other artists by providing grants for a range of artistic endeavors including recording and touring.

SOCAN


Launched: 1990
Official Site: Socan.ca
Twitter: @SOCAN
Type of Rights: Performance
2014 Revenue: $299 million
2014 Distributions: $168.6 million
Description: SOCAN (Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada) serves as Canada's PRO. It was formed in 1990 as a result of a merger of its two predecessors: The Composers, Authors and Publishers Association of Canada (CAPAC) and the Performing Rights Organization of Canada (PROCAN). SOCAN fulfills the same role as ASCAP, BMI and SESAC in the US.

CMRRA


Launched: 1975
Official Site: Cmrra.ca
Twitter: @CMRRA
Type of Rights: Mechanical
Description: CMRRA (Canadian Musical Reproduction Rights Agency) is Canada's mechanical licensing society. It also handles licensing and collection for streaming services, synchronization and the private copying levy. It is governed by a Board of Directors elected by the Canadian Music Publishers Association (CMPA). CMRRA essentially fulfills the same role as HFA in the US.

How do I collect royalties from Canada?

Canadian royalty collection can be very difficult for American songwriters without a publisher. If you're relying on your local PRO to collect performance royalties from SOCAN, you might not see royalties for up to three years, if at all. And it's virtually impossible to collect mechanical royalties from CMRRA without an affiliated publisher. The only way to collect all of your publishing royalties in Canada is to have a publisher directly registering your songs with SOCAN and CMRRA.  
Songtrust can collect all of your publishing royalties from Canada.
 

Are you owed mechanical royalties from the Canada?

Ever wondered what you might be owed for sales outside the US? Input your sales data from Canada to find out how much you're owed.






 

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International Spotlight: UK


The UK music market offers tremendous potential for American artists. As the second largest English-speaking music market (behind the US), our friends across the pond offer a great opportunity for additional spins, sales and streams.

The UK Music Market


Population: 63 million
Recorded Music Revenue: $1.33 billion (£835.2 billion)
Statutory Mechanical Royalty Rate: 6.5% of retail price for physical, 8% of retail price for digital
Notable Songwriters: Adele, John Lennon, Mick Jagger, Elton John
Description: The UK music market is the fourth largest in the world behind the US, Japan and Germany. Like most major music markets, it is still heavily reliant on physical products. Revenue from digital downloads and streaming still haven't overtaken physical products like they have in the US, but they are growing quickly. The UK has actually adopted licensed streaming services, like Spotify, at a faster rate than the US. The UK has a robust live performance industry thanks to the cultural importance of live music, particularly festivals.

PRS For Music


Launched: 1997
Official Site: PRSformusic.com
Twitter: @PRSforMusic
Type of Rights: Performance and Mechanical
2012 Revenue: $1.04 billion
2012 Distributions: $916.58 million
Description: PRS for Music, formerly known as "The MCPS-PRS Alliance", serves as the PRO and mechanical licensing society for the UK and several other territories. PRS, which handles performing rights, was founded in 1914. MCPS, which handles mechanical licensing, was founded in 1911. Essentially, PRS for Music fulfills the roles as ASCAP, BMI, SESAC and HFA in the US.  

How do I collect royalties from the UK?

UK royalty collection can be very difficult for American songwriters without a publisher. If you're relying on your local PRO to collect performance royalties from PRS, you might not see royalties for up to three years, if at all. And it's virtually impossible to collect mechanical royalties without an affiliated publisher. The only way to collect all of your publishing royalties in the UK is to have a publisher directly registering your songs with PRS.  
Songtrust can collect all of your publishing royalties from the UK.
 

Are you owed mechanical royalties from the UK?

Ever wondered what you might be owed for sales outside the US? Input your sales data from the UK to find out how much you're owed.










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Music Publishing News Weekly Roundup: January 17, 2014

BMI publishers are exploring their options following last December's rate court ruling stating publishers that withdrew their catalog solely for digital licensing on Jan. 1, 2013 are no longer part of any licensing deals that expire as of Jan. 1 2014. They are faced with two options: stay with BMI and hope the DOJ is willing to amend its consent decree or negotiate voluntary licenses at a market rate with music services. While the first option isn't a solution to below-market royalty rates, the second option will drastically change the face of music licensing, which has traditionally been done via copyright collectives. If publishers opt to leave BMI completely, there will be several far-reaching consequences, namely a severe reduction to BMI's already legally restricted bargaining position and no existing general licensing framework for publishers to collect from smaller music users like bars, stores and venues. Publishers are considering a few contingencies to handle general licensing should they choose to withdraw completely from BMI. One would be to attempt to have BMI or ASCAP handle administration, which it doesn't appear BMI is willing to do, or turning to another licensing entity that isn't confined to a consent decree, like SESAC, HFA or Music Reports. Pandora experienced a setback in its efforts to lower the royalty rate it pays to songwriters and publishers. The FCC blocked the Internet radio giant from transferring the ownership of a broadcasting license from KKMZ, the South Dakota radio station it acquired last June, because it failed to adequately comply with alien ownership limits (it couldn’t prove Pandora is at least 75% owned by US citizens). If Pandora is successful, this move would lower ASCAP and BMI’s combined rates from 3.6% to 3.4% of revenue, significantly lower than the pro-rated 10% paid by iTunes Radio. Long-anticipated subscription music service Beats Music will launch on January 21st. The service recruited Nine Inch Nails frontman Trent Reznor as its Chief Creative Officer as part of its initiative to be the artist-friendly streaming service. Beats Music's purely subscription based service ($9.99/mo subscription service, $14.99/mo family plan for AT&T customers) is expected to result in higher royalty rates than its competitors due to higher revenue per user. Beats hasn't yet released details about its royalty payouts, but this will surely be public knowledge after its first distribution.

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Music Publishing News Weekly Roundup: January 10, 2014

The NMPA and Fullscreen have reached an agreement to settle copyright infringement claims the NMPA made regarding the unlicensed use of musical compositions by creators on Fullscreen's multi-channel YouTube network. The settlement will compensate publishers for past uses of their content by opting into the agreement. In the future, Fullscreen will license the use of musical compositions through YouTube's direct licenses with publishers. Licensing the use of music in YouTube videos has proven to be a controversial topic between rightsholders and content creators. YouTube allows rightsholders to claim content to supplement its Content ID technology used to automatically detect the use of recordings and compositions in UGC. Despite these efforts, unlicensed content often falls through the cracks and remains unmonetized. Legal uses of music, such as parody videos, are also commonly taken down because these largely automated processes can't differentiate between a legal parody and infringing content. Google is also dealing with the issue of removing URLs that link to infringing content from its search engine. According to Google's Transparency Report, the search engine received over 235 million takedown requests - at least 70 million of which came from music rightsholders and reporting organizations. Takedown requests are way up this year - they had received 50 million and 10 million requests in 2012 and 2011, respectively. David Lowery and the UGA Music Business Program have began updating their list of unlicensed lyric websites. The original list prompted legal action - the NMPA sent take-down notices to the 50 unlicensed lyric sites on the list, most notably Rap Genius. Lowery and his students will update the list as sites enter and conclude licensing negotiations and when licensing agreements expire. They are also expanding their list of brands that advertise on the unlicensed sites.

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ASCAP EXPO 2014 Discount

Our wonderful friends at ASCAP have extended a discount to Songtrust members interested in attending the ASCAP 'I Create Music' EXPO. This is a great opportunity for artists, songwriters, publishers or really anyone involved in music to hone your craft, meet collaborators, get useful feedback from decision makers and learn from some of the best in the biz. The ASCAP 'I Create Music' EXPO puts you in the heart of ASCAP's community of today's most successful music creators for three days of education, networking and inspiration. Not sure if you want to attend? Check out what some attendees have to say about their experience at previous EXPOs here. Enter the code SONGTRUST during registration to receive partner pricing!

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